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Tag Archives: epistemology

One thing that usually goes without saying in the Philosophy of Science is that Theories are accumulations of hypotheses.

Methodology preaches that you begin with a hypothesis, that you try to break it as much as you can, and that as time goes and you break a lot of hypotheses, you end up with a bunch of battle-tested hypotheses, which form a theory. No one explains how a bunch of hypotheses go on to form a theory, but (i just realised) that is actually the point: They don’t. Theory is just the set of battle-tested hypotheses.

But this is a radically new way to see Theory.

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There was a big fight over Quantum Physics, in which Einstein defended Realism and Bohr defended Instrumentalism. That is a massive simplification, it seems, but it is an accepted-enough® simplification, so much so that this pseudo-quote is assigned to Bohr by PBS Space Time:

“It is meaningless to assign reality to the universe in the absence of observation”

That is a dumb simplification, but the dumbness might not be so clear. So. Read More »

A lot rests on the assumption of the I, so much so that it is even hard to show that it is an assumption. Almost everything that I know comes with a degree of uncertainty, but this little bit seems certain: I am myself.

I am unable to doubt this because I look at myself. This is a reflex, and a strong one. I introspect = look inside. I know this! How could it be wrong? Even if I go into zen-style stuff about becoming one with everything, there is still an I who is doing the becoming.

Who is it that knows there is no ego? — Alan Watts

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In one sense, Plato’s Cave Alegory is the perfect criticism of Platonism.

There might be an element of extemporaneous simplification there, but Platonism basically is saying that the idea of a triangle is more real than a triangle made of wood. This is taking flat, featureless and unreachable things in preference to actual things. Plato’s prisoners prefer the shadows than the objects that cast them. That puts Plato as the prisoner, not the free man.

Then again, flat and featureless things are easier to parse, so you could expect the cognitive system to prefer attaching to those and thus feel Platonism as more expedient. Maybe that’s why MineCraft is such huge success. Low-res pixelated images as “more Platonic”.